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Mardi Gras: What was that anyway?

Mardi+Gras+spirit%3A+Mrs.+Gilmer%E2%80%99s+third+hour+wearing+their+Mardi+Gras+masks+that+they+created+to+celebrate+on+Feb.+28%2C+2017.
Mardi Gras spirit: Mrs. Gilmer’s third hour wearing their Mardi Gras masks that they created to celebrate on Feb. 28, 2017.

Mardi Gras spirit: Mrs. Gilmer’s third hour wearing their Mardi Gras masks that they created to celebrate on Feb. 28, 2017.

Mardi Gras spirit: Mrs. Gilmer’s third hour wearing their Mardi Gras masks that they created to celebrate on Feb. 28, 2017.

Ana Viveros, Ana Viveros

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Mardi Gras is a big celebration throughout the world. French classes here at Rogers High School celebrated for a week trying to get ready for the official day, Feb. 28, 2017.

Mrs. Rebecca Gilmer, who teaches French at RHS, celebrated this holiday with her classes for a week. However, many other places celebrated Mardi Gras.

“Mardi Gras is a French holiday that is celebrated all over the world. It is celebrated in the southern part of the United States. It’s celebrated in France, Italy, [and] Germany”. Gilmer said.

Some people do not actually know what Mardi Gras is, or how it is celebrated.

“It was originally a Catholic holiday. It’s the last Tuesday before lent starts on Ash Wednesday, and Mardi Gras means ‘Fat Tuesday’. So it’s the last day to sort of indulge in all these things you’re probably going to give up like chocolate or coffee” Gilmer said.

Not only is it a Catholic holiday, but it is also a French holiday. French classes are taught about about the background of Mardi Gras.

“We celebrate in class by celebrating those three cultures: the French, Cajun, and Creole people, and so we have food celebrating those three groups. Then we make Mardi Gras masks, and we wear our masks” Gilmer said.

Design it: Mrs. Gilmer’s third hour making their homemade masks. They wore them on Tuesday to celebrate the official day of Mardi Gras.

Mardi Gras has specific customs. For the French classes, it is an important holiday. There is a king and queen involved in this holiday. At RHS there was one chosen in each class.

“We have traditional king cake. The king cake is shaped like a crown, and inside is a baby. Who ever gets the baby in the king cake is the king or queen for the day [then] they bring the cake the next year” Gilmer said.

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Mardi Gras: What was that anyway?