Review of “1922”

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Review of “1922”

Kinsey Langley, Editor

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Warning:Spoilers

Stephan King is known for his specifically spine-chilling novels. Books that have already been turned into movies are features such as “Carrie,” “The Shining,” “Cujo,” “It,” and many many more. Most recently though, his novel “1922” has been transformed into a film and added to Netflix.

The movie starts off with an ordinary family living on a farm just off of the small town of Hemingford Home, Nebraska. The household consists of the wife, Arlette Christina Winters James, the son, Henry Freeman James, and the husband Wilfred James. Arlette is not exactly fond of living on the farm and would rather sell her half of the land so they can go out and live in the city. According to Wilfred, the city is for dumb people and he is angered with his wife’s crave for it. At the time, Henry has fallen for the girl next door and a move to the city would break them apart. The father realizes this and since he’s already fed up with her, he asks Henry to help him kill the wife. They eventually do, and try to keep it their little secret.

A while goes by and the husband can feel something in the earth change. Something eerie. After burying her body, he notices things that seem a little off. He feels terrorized by rats and believes his wife is haunting him. Through this story, they show the journey of him going, with lack of better words, insane. It’s shown in flashbacks and daydream terrors. Once his son disappears, his guilty conscious only seems to grow. Wilfred moves into a cramped hotel room to try and escape reality, but realization sets it that what he did was awful, and Arlwasn’t going to let him forget it.

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