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Fine arts is forgotten in the shadow of sports

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Fine arts is forgotten in the shadow of sports

Katie Jones, Staff Writer

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Taking a fine arts and some type of physical education class are both required to graduate, but one of them is lacking in funds. While basketball and football get funding from booster clubs, the fine arts department is not so lucky. With less funding, this limits a student’s full potential from being reached even though they are just as passionate as their sport participant counterparts.

Orchestra, band, art, and theater are among the fine arts that fall short financially. Art teachers are forced to charge students for simply taking a ceramics class and are having to glue back together paint brushes. With a budget of only $1000 provided annually, fine arts teacher have to pay with their own money for supplies they need. Besides not being compensated for this out of pocket money, the fine arts department is also missing a director. While there is an athletic director, a fine arts director is still to be hired. The lack of a director makes it seem almost as if the fine arts are inferior to sports.

Students are being kept from achieving their true potential in the arts with insufficient funding, while athletes get updated equipment every few years. To illustrate the challenges, scholarships are harder to obtain when money becomes an obstacle for these art driven students. Furthermore student may not be able to enter in a competition because the school does not have the necessary supplies to they need. This lack of funding is not only damaging the students themselves but it is limiting the overall growth of the general fine arts department and school as well.

While both types of classes are equally important, it makes no sense that sports would receive more attention and money. Getting a fine arts director and booster clubs would bring a dramatic improvement to the financial stability of the department. With better funding’s provided from booster clubs and the more attention received that comes with a respective director, students of the fine arts would have an even bigger opportunity of becoming the next Mozart or Picasso. Fine arts teachers would also get to keep the money they are spending on supplies making them happier, their students more productive, and an overall more successful school.

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Fine arts is forgotten in the shadow of sports